1993 Kawasaki ZG1200 Voyager XII from Germany

Summary:

Ride 200 miles without a visor on your helmet and still have a smile on your face when you arrive

Faults:

Wrong alternator fitted by a previous owner (Suzuki) shorted and fried a lot of electrical (including the speedo/revcounter) components.

Clutch cage bearings worn out.

Speedo drive/gear rusted solid.

Turn signal cancelling stopped working.

General Comments:

I live in Germany and it's very difficult to get any of the plastic parts. However many of the components are used on other Kawasaki models. So with a bit of patience and the internet, alternatives can be found.

After a bad crash caused by a mysterious uncontrollable tank slapper at about 90mph, the fairing and trunk are destroyed and it's too expensive to get the parts second hand from the States to here (price + freight + import taxes + customs).

So it'll get rebuilt with the help of Vetter...

Apart from that, a wonderful bike that I enjoyed riding. Sure it had problems with the front end wobbling, but that was mostly a problem with fork pressure/tyre pressure and/or rear suspension set up.

It was a joy to ride either on the autobahn or in town, alone or two up with all our junk.

I'm thinking about buying another, but here in Germany they can be very expensive...

Would you buy another motorcycle from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 7th January, 2016

1993 Kawasaki ZG1200 Voyager XII from United States of America

Summary:

Fast, top heavy, forks tend to shimmy easy, and is low maintenance

Faults:

Well, it's a very well engineered machine, as every Kawasaki I have owned through the decades has been. Fairly low maintenance machines. After 80,000+ miles, keep some synthetic 20-50 weight oil on hand.

General Comments:

Well, the main issues with this particular bike are that the forks tend to shimmy at take off at times, and when sharp bumps (holes, rocks, etc) are hit. Also, try to keep both hands on the handlebars, as it will start to shimmy a little going down the road sometimes, and could get uncontrollable. I'm looking at adding an aftermarket superbrace to see if that controls the forks shimmy issue.

The other issue is that it is very top heavy. You sit higher than the other full dress 1200+ bikes. Reminds me of my 1960s, and 70s Honda CBs; top heavy and 800-900 lbs, plus a rider sitting even higher, can get to be quite a workout!

Overall, it should still be on the road for much longer, as it's a "Kow", built in Nebraska!

Would you buy another motorcycle from this manufacturer? Yes

Review Date: 12th August, 2015

1st May 2016, 03:45

If the front of the bike shimmies, your tires are cupped due to low pressure. If you keep the tire pressure slightly higher, tires will not cup as easy and the bike will be very smooth even if you remove your hands from handle bars briefly. You will notice when tires are brand new there is no tank slapping or shimmying.

4th Sep 2016, 06:59

The Voyager 12 is a wild mustang. Hold on or it will buck you off.

16th Mar 2017, 23:26

Why do you say it will buck you off?? Is it not stable at high speeds?

20th Jul 2017, 17:07

The shimmy problem probably with the front was most likely a tire problem; cupped, low pressure, the tires on a shaft drive cup and cup more on the right side and it's noticeable more if the bike has been driven hard, and if the bike had stock front springs the air pressure might have been low also; you can't use a bicycle tire pump to put air in with, there is a special pump to pump them and the rear air shocks up with; any Harley shop will have one.

And these bikes have a low center of gravity; it's a very nimble bike, yes it's not as low as a sports bike, but it's lower than the other big touring bikes.

The only complaint I have with these bike is the seat; it's 1980's tech. And it gets to you. On long long rides, I got an air seat pad I use.